Kate Thorn

Kate Thorn

Kate Thorn

Bachelor of Occupational Therapy

Senior Hand Therapist and Clinic Coordinator

Gold Coast Hand Therapy, Australia

About Kate Thorn

Kate is committed to providing and teaching high-quality evidence-based hand therapy

Kate is a Certified Hand Therapist with full membership to the Australian Hand Therapy Association (AHTA). She graduated from the University of Queensland in 2006 with a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy. Kate joined the GC Hand Therapy team in 2007 and is committed to ongoing professional development, student education, leading research programs, and developing research protocols. She has experience in different clinical settings and has a keen interest in research and traumatic hand injuries.

Kate Thorn on Physioplus:

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Displaying 8 courses.
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Central Slip and Mallet Finger Management

Extensor tendon injuries of the hand are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Injury mechanisms include hyperflexion, direct blunt trauma, and penetrating trauma. A disruption of the extensor mechanism over zone III and detachment of the central slip may result in a boutonniere deformity, characterised by flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint and hyperextension of the distal interphalangeal joint. The term mallet finger refers to an injury of the terminal extensor mechanism of the hand and leads to a loss of active extension at the distal interphalangeal joint. Treatment for central slip and mallet finger injuries ranges from non-operative management with splinting to surgical repair. Physiotherapists play an important role in the management of these types of injuries to prevent disfigurement and impaired hand function in patients.
1.1 points
0% Complete
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Early Management of Distal Radius Fractures with ORIF

Distal radius fracture is one of the most common fractures and often requires surgical intervention. This course is the first in a series of courses examining the physiotherapy management of distal radius fractures following open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgery. This course will describe the aetiology of distal radius fractures. It will discuss the classification of these fractures, likely outcomes and potential complications, as well as provide a detailed rehabilitation protocol for the first 6 weeks post surgery.
1.3 points
0% Complete
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Extensor Tendon Injury Management

Extensor tendon injuries to the hand and forearm are frequently seen in clinical practice and its superficial location makes these tendons extremely susceptible to lacerations or other open injuries. The extensor mechanism of the wrist and hand is a complex system and integrity of these structures key for optimal hand function. Knowledge of relevant anatomy and an understanding of the physiopathology of extensor tendons are essential in the rehabilitation of these types of injuries. The postoperative management of extensor tendon repair is key to a successful outcome for the patient and various rehabilitation approaches are available to physiotherapists and hand therapists.
1.1 points
0% Complete
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Fabricating a Volar Splint for Distal Radius Wrist Fracture

Distal radius fracture is one of the most common fractures and often requires surgical intervention. This course is the third in a series of courses examining the physiotherapy management of distal radius fractures following open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgery. In this course, Kate Thorn will teach you the steps on how to fabricate a volar extension wrist splint for individuals following ORIF surgery.
0.6 points
0% Complete
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Flexor Tendon Injury Management

The flexor tendons of the hand are essential for complex hand function. Injuries to these tendons may be caused by open cuts, crush injuries, degloving injuries and also by sudden forced extension of the fingers or thumb resulting in an injury where the tendon is pulled away from the bone. Flexor tendon injuries are relatively common and the incidence is higher in males and in people aged 20 - 29 years. These injuries are often managed with surgery and rehabilitation interventions after surgical repair are key to successful outcomes. Physiotherapists require a good understanding of the anatomy of the hand and also the evidence base supporting appropriate rehabilitation following surgery in order to provide optimum management for patients with flexor tendon injuries.
1.1 points
0% Complete
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Management of Distal Radius Fractures Programme

The distal fracture of the radius is the most common fracture of the wrist and so is regularly seen by clinicians. Where this injury is sufficiently severe it is treated with surgery involving open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). Due to the many types and severity of fractures observed and the variety of treatment techniques utilised the clinician needs to have a deep understanding of the related conditions and versatility in their treatment options. This programme of courses addresses these needs in a comprehensive examination of the physiotherapy management of distal radius fractures following open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgery.
8.2 points
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Management of Distal Radius Fractures with ORIF from 6 weeks

Distal radius fracture is one of the most common fractures and often requires surgical intervention. This course is the second in a series of courses examining the physiotherapy management of distal radius fractures following open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) surgery. This course will provide a detailed rehabilitation protocol from 6 weeks post surgery, as well as discussing potential complications that can arise at this point.
1.3 points
0% Complete
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Upper Limb Trauma Programme

Upper limb trauma is one of the most commonly seen injuries in emergency departments, up to 20-40% of all injuries. Most upper limb injuries are seen in the wrist and forearm. Injuries can result from different causes including bicycle, vehicle and motorcycle accidents, falls from heights, sport-related, work, electrical, altercations, explosions, and conflict-related. It is rare that upper extremity injuries are life-threatening, but poor management can lead to severe dysfunction. Physiotherapists require a good understanding of the anatomy of the hand and also the evidence base supporting appropriate rehabilitation following surgery in order to provide optimum management for patients following upper limb injuries. Additionally knowledge of relevant anatomy and an understanding of the physiopathology of extensor tendons are essential in the rehabilitation of these types of injuries.
10 points
0% Complete